Placental Tissue For Cosmetic Surgery?

Royal Biologics (Jersey City, N.J.) has launched a new amniotic stem cell product to treat a multitude of conditions across several fields of medicine, including aesthetics.

Amnio-Maxx is derived from human amniotic placental tissue and comes in two forms: liquid amnion and dehydrated dual-layer patches.

Amnion, which is placental tissue that surrounds and protects the fetus during development in utero, consists mainly of fibrillar and membranous collagens, plus elastin and a mix of cytokines and growth factors, which are unique properties to placental tissues. Besides benefiting the growing fetus, these properties have been shown to treat and protect a wide variety of wounds, while concurrently creating an environment conducive to the regeneration of healthy tissue.

Royal Biologics declined to be interviewed for this story because cosmetic surgery is an off-label application of Amnio-Maxx. However, in a press release, company CEO Salvatore Leo stated that “studies in published literature support the successful and safe clinical use of repurposing this versatile tissue to improve outcomes in wound management. This tissue, including amniotic fluid, can be utilized safely in a variety of surgical and clinical settings, and can develop into various tissue types including skin, cartilage, cardiac tissue, nerves, muscle, and bone.”

Amnion has been successfully used in a range of clinical settings. Applications include spine and neurologic surgery, bariatric surgery, sports medicine, wound care and trauma. And Amnio-Maxx itself has demonstrated significant benefits: a safe, natural covering that enhances normal wound healing outcomes; reduced inflammation; decreased fibrosis and scarring at the surgical site; and decreased pain.

To ensure safety and maximize the performance of each graft, Amnio-Maxx is sterilized using a proprietary process. The collection of the donor tissue is also aseptically performed by licensed tissue establishments.

In addition, all placentas used are from planned C-sections to minimize potential contamination during recovery. Placental donors are also tested to confirm they are disease-free.

Related posts